Monday, March 16, 2009

Kelly tries to foil bank robbers

From the NY Times:

Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly has expressed concern over the frequency of bank robberies and the seeming ease in carrying them out, particularly at certain branches. He met in January with executives of major banks to push a set of “best practices” for security that were developed in 2003, during the last wave of robberies. Inspector Neacy, who commands the Major Case Squad, has followed up with branch managers.

Now, in the face of a surge, Mr. Kelly said he might push for a city law first contemplated six years ago to require dividers of reinforced glass between customers and tellers, along with other measures he believes would help deter the crimes and lead to more arrests.

Besides barriers, the police want banks to use guards or greeters — TD branches do this — who might deter would-be criminals by their presence. They also want banks to use dye packs when filling bags with cash, to put height markers by doorways to determine heights of suspects, and to have countertops on which a robber can leave fingerprints.

Michael P. Smith, the president of the New York Bankers Association, a group that represents commercial banks and thrift institutions in the state, including 1,600 branches in the city, said he would prefer that banks tailor their own security plans rather than have blanket directives foisted upon them by law.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Bankers hesitate to use the reinforced glass because it can degrade customer service, but it is necessary.

I remember as a teller I would sometimes size up the way customers were acting on line and I would photocopy checks until someone else got them.

Other times I would grab the steel based nameplate holders nearby to keep agitated customers from hurling one at my head. Risking brain damage is a lot to ask for a minimum wage job.

Excellent security protects both employees and customers. Bank robberies are very common and rarely reported. I testified before two grand juries before I was 25. That is why I am a secretary now.

I applaud Kelly for insisting on common sense.

Taxpayer said...

"Michael P. Smith, the president of the New York Bankers Association, a group that represents commercial banks and thrift institutions in the state, including 1,600 branches in the city, said he would prefer that banks tailor their own security plans rather than have blanket directives foisted upon them by law."

Mr. Smith. Those sensible recommendations were made in 2003. The banks you represent clearly would rather take big bonuses, or hold expensive exotic meetings rather than protect your employees or customers or their customers' assets.

Time's up. You've taken taxpayer money. You wanted to be state-owned. Now you are. Deliver the protection.

Mike Tirelli said...

Somehow I think taking Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly's advice is a good idea.Isn't this is job? And he's very good at it.