Wednesday, November 28, 2007

Hunters Point dorm plan gets thumbs down

A plan to build a six-story grad school dormitory and a 13-story residential tower across from the massive Queens West development in Hunters Point is meeting with stiff opposition from the local community board.

Community board opposed to plan for dorm, tower in Hunters Point

This month, the land use committee of Queens Community Board 2 unanimously voted to reject a Board of Standards and Appeals variance application for the dorm, which would house 220 CUNY Graduate School students, and the apartment tower, with a planned 169 units and ground floor retail.

"Dormitory housing in itself is transient housing at its best and offers no stability to the community. We believe that it is a detriment to the growth of Hunters Point," said Board 2 Chairman Joseph Conley in a letter to the BSA.


Try Community Board 1. They won't say no.

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hey, Crappie, you got that right! I understand they want to convert one of those buildings on Northern Boulevard into a massive dorm.

Hell, Dutch Kills is busily speeding the process for approving a big increase so how about the city's largest dorm, at say, 12 stories, in the MIDDLE OF NOWHERE!

Anonymous said...

The comments about the dorm are ridiculous. These are graduate students, not kids. How is this so much less stable than the luxury rental buildings nearby?

keepin' it real said...

Graduate students, yes, but ones from CUNY, which is the equivalent of having Junior High students move into the area, as CUNY schools have very low standards and attract bottom of the barrel students and would-be hipsters.

kingofnycabbies said...

College girls getting shitfaced at my local, the LIC Bar--can I help with the construction, you know, speed things up a bit?

verdi said...

I guess that Rockrose
and the rest of those Queens West developers
don't want any of those college frat house
pissing and puking parties going on
in the midst of the "upscale"real estate
that they're trying to sell !

Michael said...

"Keepin it real" and "king of ny cabbies" obviously have no education themselves.
These are students studying for their Phd's and Masters. The best and brightest, most of them would be in their late twenties and not big drinkers since they spend most of their time studying and working.
I would prefer to have future doctors and lawyers as neigbors any day rather then people who spell keeping without a g and some guy who thinks being a king of cabbie's is good and being a grad student is bad.

keepin-g! it real said...

Just because someone doesn't have an advanced degree like yourself, Micheal, doesn't give you the right to look down on 'em.

This is why residents in a lot of communities do not like "hipsters," because they walk about like they're better than everybody else, just because they memorized a bunch of books.

Don't get me wrong. Learning is a fine thing, but so is raising a family and doing what you've got to do to support 'em, whether that be pumping gas or working a 6-2 shift on a loading dock.

And as to the King of Cabbies, I enjoy his comments. They're honest and accurate...and pretty darned funny.

Michael said...

No, I am sorry you cannot defend someone who bashes CUNY and says that they have "very low standards" and "attract bottom of the barrel students" the term is dis-information. This low-class, loser gets no sympathy and your working man story sound like a load of bullshit to me. CUNY grad students are extremely, intelligent and gifted and they go to CUNY because it is a great University for an inexpensive price. Most people that go to CUNY schools are your next door neighbors not hipsters whom you seem to have this hatred for.
I am not looking down on people that work hard wheteher it's at a gas station, a loading dock, in a kitchen, or driving a truck. I work hard defending our union laborors of Local's throughout NYC. I never look down on people for how hard they work, I just look down on people who talk out of their ass!!

Anonymous said...

That really is hilarious - someone ignorantly criticizes CUNY graduate students, and then when it is pointed out how simple-minded their criticism is, they complain that "hipsters" are talking down to them. The criticism of your comment had nothing to do with your education, it had to do with your disrespect and lack of knowledge.

Jordan said...

Don't know about the Graduate Center, but undergraduates at CUNY are pretty pathetic. I got straight A's during 4 very grueling years of private high school. Then I went to CUNY-Hunter College. It was a party. Here's what you get:

1) Open admissions which means anyone with a pulse can get in.
2) Groups of foreign students who openly cheat in their language. Should someone actually care enough to report them, nothing happens to them.
3) Tenured faculty who says, "I don't feel like teaching today. Let's tell dirty jokes instead (TRUE STORY)".
4) Tax-subsidized "remedial education" for people who can't read or write and shouldn't have been accepted in the first place.
5) Kids whose tuition is paid for 100% by the government hanging out in the hallways during class.
6) Angry mobs of minority students in the hallways denouncing whites and asians. This happened multiple times a week.
7) When you don't like your grade, you file a protest against your teacher and either the department head changes the grade or pressures the faculty member to do so.
8) Social promotion to inflate their graduation rates.

Anonymous said...

Michael,

Stopping kidding yourself. I live right down the block form the Riverview, the latest in crap luxury developments in Queens West. The majority of people in that building are in their mid twenties (college educated, I'm sure) with ridiculous paying jobs who–on any given night– like to pee and puke on my street, in front of my building, on their way to their million dollar high rise. They're also transients, staying for a year or two then moving on or back home with a big fat job from NYC on their resumes.

I went to college, was a grad student, and trust me, plenty of grad students party.

Anonymous said...

Michael,

Stopping kidding yourself. I live right down the block from the Riverview, the latest in crap luxury developments in Queens West. The majority of people in that building are in their mid twenties (college educated, I'm sure) with ridiculous paying jobs who–on any given night– like to pee and puke on my street, in front of my building, on their way to their million dollar high rise. They're also transients, staying for a year or two then moving on or back home with a big fat job from NYC on their resumes.

I went to college, was a grad student, and trust me, plenty of grad students party.

keepin' it real said...

9. Gullible fools, like Michael, who buy into their inflated graduation rates.

michael really said...

"I work hard defending our union laborors of Local's throughout NYC," in between the time I spend blogging on my computer.

Talk about bs!!!

mazeartist said...

I graduated CCNY this year, and proud of it. The school's standards have greatly improved in the past decade. We study from the same textbooks as students in brand-name colleges, but we have an affordable tuition.

allen ginsberg said...

"Who threw potato salad at CCNY lecturers on Dadaism and subsequently presented themselves on the granite steps of the madhouse with shaven heads..."

kingofnycabbies said...

Michael:

Sorry my obviously humorous comment so mortally offended you. (At least you didn't come right out and say it wasn't funny!) And I'm sorry you think being the "King of Cabbies" is not "good"--my last name is King, so the self-mocking boast is inevitable; if I licked stamps for a living, it would be "King of Stamplickers."

But in what way is that claim, if honest, not "good"? I've lived in LIC for 15 years, I've driven a cab for a garage on Vernon Boulevard for 14 of those, so I know my local cred is in order. My job is an extremely difficult and absolutely essential one, and one which I attempt to do as professionally as possible. I take a great deal of pride in doing honest work as well as I can, despite the deep-seated (and, granted, not always unfair) prejudices displayed against cabbies by public and government alike. Isn't that something that you, who took time to boast of his sympathy for the working stiff, should applaud, not deride?