Friday, November 23, 2007

Great Queens mosaic extends to Little Neck

When the Chinese-owned multi-ethnic grocery store, New York Mart, began attracting droves of customers shortly after opening last month, complaints poured in about the lack of available parking. Its owners thought they had the problem beat with the creation of a new parking lot, but that measure, in turn, has sparked a new round of outrage among nearby residents upset over the removal of trees and what they describe as poor maintenance.

Parking woes dog Little Neck market

"This is terrible. The entire block is up in arms," protested Shelly McKeever, a 30-year-resident of Deepdale Gardens on 56th Avenue, located behind New York Mart and other stores along the Horace Harding Expressway strip.

For her part, McKeever rattled off a host of complaints about problems associated with the tree removal as well as the property manager's overall performance: the smell of fish, dumpster leakage, car fumes, light shining from parking lot lamps, and honking as people fight over space.

Community Board 11 District Manager Susan Seinfeld said her office has fielded a number of complaints from Deepdale residents. Addressing their concerns, she spoke with the property owner, Musso Properties after sending them a letter from the board reflecting worries over fumes, rodents and harsh lighting.

...a company official told her 22 new parking spaces would be created as the current retaining wall comes down. A new wall will be erected when the project is completed in an estimated four or five weeks ---roughly coinciding with the completion of a new multi-ethnic restaurant right next to the grocery store, run by the same owners.

28 comments:

Anonymous said...

This market is for the tweeded.

They, not taxpayers, voters, or property owners, are in the catbird seat.

That is what happens when you live in a one party state.

georgetheatheist said...

Shelley McKeever: "The produce is gorgeous and the fish is so fresh."

I love Chinese supermarkets too, especially when they take the live fish out of the tanks and club it to death in front of you. Now that's fresh!

[Puleeeze, Whipple-san, don't squeeze the dead fish!]

ken said...

hard to believe that a mere grocery store could draw in so many customers. Maybe there's a really cute chic working the register or something?

Queens Crapper said...

I guess you haven't been to Woodhaven Blvd and Metropolitan Avenue lately... Trader Joe's.

ken said...

never heard of Trader Joe's. Sounds like a cool shop, though, like the sort of place you'd expect to find up in Alaska, alongside a saloon. Any saddled horses stationed out front?

georgetheatheist said...

Easy, Crapper, easy.

Anonymous said...

So are you glad we have the Trader Joe's or are you against it?

ken said...

sounds like Trader Joe's is not a good fit for the nabe it's in. If it were located in a more out of the way spot that would probably be better for everybody.

Though it would be difficult to enforce, there might be some sort of a new zoning regulation created that would put a cap on the number of customers a store could bring in.

For instance, no stores (excluding gas stations, of course) would be allowed in or nearby a residential neighborhood if its total number of estimated customers exceeded 200per day.

With some tweaking such an amendment might prove effective, preventing communities from being overwhelmed with an influx of traffic.

Anonymous said...

Don't count on anything substantial from CB #11.
They're out to lunch for the duration.

And the 111th PCT is known as the "country club" !

Anonymous said...

You have to be one of the only people around that is not happy to have the Trader Joe's on Metropolitan Avenue. Having that business in that area, in a previously abandoned building, is a homerun.

ken said...

like I was saying, I've never been to Trader Joe's and don't even know what they sell there so I really can't offer an opinion on it one way or the other, only to say that stores that draw in tons of customers generally aren't good news when they're located in residential areas for the people who live immediately nearby. The convenience is offset by the hassle of all the increased congestion.

Just my personal opinion.

Anonymous said...

Trader Joes is not next to residential houses. It is next to a car wash, a gas station and a Sports Authority. If it is drawing big crowds, that means it is popular with the people going there. You should go see it first and then comment.

Julie said...

Trader Joe's sits in the middle of a residential community. Yes, there is a gas station and a Home Depot in close proximity, but Rego Park, Glendale and Forest Hills all come together there and they are all residential. And traffic backup due in part to Trader Joe's (and in part due to the other big box retail businesses already there) is affecting those communities detrimentally.

Anonymous said...

Just wait until they build that school down the street and all the buses block the traffic.

Anonymous said...

"Trader Joes is not next to residential houses...If it is drawing big crowds, that means it is popular with the people going there."

Well "fucking duh". First of all, Ken never said it was next to houses. Why would someone need to see it first to comment on the established fact that there is more traffic at the intersection of Metro and Woodhaven, in the middle of a residential NEIGHBORHOOD because of it? This sounds like someone who thought Home Depot at the gas tanks site was a good idea..."well, it's next to a railroad track, not houses..."

Anonymous said...

I live in Deepdale near this new supermarket and was praying for a Trader Joe's and got this smelly store. Yuk.

Anonymous said...

I know it is hard for some people to speak without being crude, but I'll respond anyway. The benefits of having the Trader Joes far outweighs the increased traffic, which really isn't all that bad given how easy it is to get off Metro and into the parking lot. As for the "residential" location, this building is about as away from the residential area as you can get. Just about any location anywhere in New York City is going to be somewhat close to a residential neighborhood. What would you have preferred, that the building had remained abandoned? Everybody I know that lives in the area loves the fact that we have a Trader Joes.

Queens Crapper said...

What would you have preferred, that the building had remained abandoned?

There are other businesses in the same building so it wouldn't have stayed abandoned.

Everybody I know that lives in the area loves the fact that we have a Trader Joes.

And there are people I know who don't. This isn't a very convincing argument.

Anonymous said...

"The benefits of having the Trader Joes far outweighs the increased traffic, which really isn't all that bad given how easy it is to get off Metro and into the parking lot."

Turning onto Metro from Woodhaven is a flippin' nightmare.

Anonymous said...

Just about any location anywhere in New York City is going to be somewhat close to a residential neighborhood.
________________________

Actually, the Restaurant Depot in West Maspeth is a good example of where to place a high-volume food store away from residential neighborhoods. Since it's difficult to lug groceries home on the bus, you need to drive to get them.

georgetheatheist said...

"Turning ono Metro from Woodhaven is a flippin' nightmare." Def! The left turn-controlled signal is a mile long. I snuck up to the intersection in the neighboring right lane. [Guilty, your honor.] AND trying to get out of the Trader Joe's-Staples-Michael's parking lot another nightmare.

BTW, what is this mystique with Trader Joe's already? I went in for the first time, wandered the aisles, saw some fancy-schmancy packaged grub, and high-tailed it out. I can get the same vittles in a Stop and Shop.

verdi said...

Bring in a Starbucks.....
the "saviour" of neighborhoods....
and all problems will vanish (gag) !

Anonymous said...

That Metro-Woodhaven left turn has been the same way for years. It is also easily avoided by going down Yellowstone and up to Metro, or by the turn past it on Woodhaven. By your rationale, we should get rid of the supermarkets on Yellowstone, on Austin, and the Stop-and-Shop on Union Turnpike, because they are also in residential areas.
As for Trader Joes popularity in the neighborhood, I would wager you any amount that, by far, more people are happy about it than against it.

Queens Crapper said...

"By your rationale, we should get rid of the supermarkets on Yellowstone, on Austin, and the Stop-and-Shop on Union Turnpike, because they are also in residential areas."

I don't have a "rationale". Just stating the fact that the Trader Joe's brought more traffic to an already congested area and a mitigation solution doesn't seem to be forthcoming. BTW, I suggested months back that signs be placed at the intersection directing drivers to stay right on Woodhaven and use the underpass. And that seems to be what you are suggesting. Stop stealing my ideas. ;)

noah webster said...

Democratic Dictionary:

"Mosaic.....vibrant.....bustling".

Definition........
your neighborhood is going downhill !

Johanna said...

Gosh, I go to the Trader Joe's in Rego Park via bus (the Q54) all the time & find it really convenient. Maybe all those people complaining about parking should try transit!

Anonymous said...

How the hell do you lug your groceries home on the bus, lady?

Anonymous said...

“Traitor Joe”