Sunday, July 13, 2008

Why CUNY needs so many dorms

Next time you read comments on this blog about how dorms dumped in Flushing or Long Island City are good because they are being built "for the people of NYC", please keep this in mind:

CHEAPER CUNY ATTRACTS BIG NATIONAL AUDIENCE

Last year, 33,000 freshman enrolled at colleges in the City University of New York system. Last month, applications by prospective freshmen rose 5.4 percent compared to the same month in 2007.

Of those prospective freshmen, 18.4 percent hailed from outside the state, according to the data obtained by The Post.

CUNY - a system of 23 colleges and graduate schools - charges full-time students from outside New York about $4,000 a semester to attend one of its four-year colleges - twice as much as city and state residents.


And still much cheaper than the tuition at any private college in NYC.

34 comments:

Anonymous said...

Since the city (and Team Gioia and Community Board 2) has all but turned their back on the community for all this wonderful new development, why not take it another step.

Fill the community with transients who will do nothing to stand up to the politicans or developers, and even sustain their efforts at underminding the people that live there their entire lives.

Anonymous said...

So what's the problem. We build dorms, open the school to a larger talent pool of candidates, improve the quality of candidates ultimately accepted, and end up 1)enhancing the value of a CUNY diploma and 2) having a smarter workforce available in NYC. God Forbid....ass.

Truman Harris said...

If my tax dollars are being used to subsidize a dorm for out of state kids while NYC kids are turned away, then yes, I have a big problem with that. A CUNY diploma is more than acceptable for most jobs in this city. In fact, most of the time, you find the person doing the interviewing went to a CUNY school, too.

Anonymous said...

Yes, we need to expand the pool of applicants, because concentrating on educating native NYC kids lowers the value of a CUNY diploma.

Anonymous said...

Now how do you figure that the value of the diploma is lowered by only accepting NYC students?

This is quite a ridiculous statement when there are many brilliant students who reside here in the five boroughs.

Anonymous said...

Is this the one with Queens Council of the Arts?

Anonymous said...

It was meant to be ridiculous, to illustrate the point that #2 was trying to make is stupid. We're the most diverse city in the world; we therefore should have a diverse pool of applicants for CUNY. Remember: Diversity is strength!

Anonymous said...

again morons just bitching without thought produces 0. The positive economic impact of out of town students is huge. No town, village or city "suffers" in having more dormed students, this is just another cse of reacting negatively to ANY change. Truman you are truly an asshole, more often than not a CUNY grad is not doing the interview, your tax dollars are pennies compared to the increased revenue these students bring in, let's not forget dormed students drive less and need fewer buses so you can roam around free from the hazards of moving vehicles to find the next complaint you will do nothing about.

Anonymous said...

"let's not forget dormed students drive less and need fewer buses so you can roam around free from the hazards of moving vehicles to find the next complaint you will do nothing about."

Every out of town CUNY student I have ever met had a car. It was how they moved their laundry back and forth on the weekends. Many times they would leave their cars in Brooklyn or Queens and subway back to the City.

Anonymous said...

" your tax dollars are pennies compared to the increased revenue these students bring in"

Most college students don't have a lot of money to burn, at least they didn't back in the 1990s when I attended CUNY, so I am not sure what increased revenue this city is making on them vs. a native.

Anonymous said...

The thought behind CUNY was to give people from our urban environment an education that previously was only accessible to those with a lot of money. So much for that.

Queens Crapper said...

CUNY's history dates back to the formation of the Free Academy in 1847 by Townsend Harris. The school was fashioned as "a Free Academy for the purpose of extending the benefits of education gratuitously to persons who have been pupils in the common schools of the …city and county of New York." The Free Academy later became The City College, the first CUNY college. From this grew a system of seven senior colleges, four hybrid schools, six community colleges, as well as graduate schools and professional programs. CUNY was established in 1961 as the umbrella institution of the municipal colleges of New York City.

CUNY has historically served a diverse student body, especially those excluded from or unable to afford private universities. CUNY offered a high quality, tuition-free education to the poor, the working class and the immigrants of New York City until 1975, when the City's fiscal crisis forced the imposition of tuition. Many Jewish academics and intellectuals studied and taught at CUNY in the post-World War I era when Ivy League universities, such as Yale University, discriminated against Jews. The City College of New York has had a reputation of being "the Harvard of the proletariat."

Queens Crapper said...

"A third of college graduates in New York City are CUNY graduates, with the institution enrolling about half of all college students in New York City."

Anonymous said...

Wow crappy, you're a human encyclopedia.

I went to a CUNY and didn't know any of that.

You've enlightened me.

Queens Crapper said...

Not a human encyclopedia; I just Wiki'ed :)

Anonymous said...

again morons just bitching without thought produces 0. The positive economic impact of out of town students is huge. No town, village or city "suffers" in having more dormed students, this is just another cse of reacting negatively to ANY change.
---------

Some of us DONT WORK for a developer, and some of us DONT WORK for a politican, so we can state facts.

No community likes to be swamped with students. Ask the communities around NYU and Colunbia.

Hell, ask anyone around a high school.

Anonymous said...

Just what the area needs.

Hotels to the north of em, empty towers to the south, and stuck in the middle with a bunch of students from Animal House.

The machine sure knows how to build strong communities.

Western Queens will soon become a freakin zoo.

Anonymous said...

No community likes to be swamped with students. Ask the communities around NYU and Colunbia.

Hell, ask anyone around a high school.

those schools were there and established long before anyone who is bitching about them was around. high schools are different animals. NO community suffers economically by having dormed students. What facts are you stating you're just complaining.

Truman Harris said...

Who said anything about suffering economically? What about quality-of-life? Ask St. John's University neighbors.

Anonymous said...

Ask St. John's University neighbors.

Actually for all their bitching there has been no tangible quality of life effect, other than some people who say we don't like that.
tilt at windmills all you want you're just going to end up dying angry

Anonymous said...

So, what you're saying is just bend over and take it.

Thank God there weren't more people like you in Colonial times or we would've been saluting the Union Jack today.

Queens Crapper said...

"Actually for all their bitching there has been no tangible quality of life effect"

I suppose you missed the posts about the dorm builders undermining the foundation of the house next door, the pools of stagnant water on the property, which caused them to bring in pump trucks, and the fact that there is no sewer plan for the property.

Anonymous said...

No community likes to be swamped with students. Ask the communities around NYU and Colunbia.

Hell, ask anyone around a high school.

----

Great! Now can we stop the endless bitching about how there are no schools in Queens? No one wants them anymore.

Anonymous said...

Everyone wants schools. Maybe instead of turning warehouses into luxury condos, they can turn them into schools. This way residential areas will be protected from high school hooligans.

Queens Crapper said...

People here have better ideas than the city planners!

Anonymous said...

People here have better ideas than the city planners!

IDEAS? who cares about ideas, the world moves on ACTIONS, leave the house and do something other than taking pictures to have more IDEAS about.

Anonymous said...

Why is the city turning its vacant land over to developers for a $1 instead of building more public schools on it?

Anonymous said...

We are not in the position to make our ideas become reality. Our elected officials and city agencies do. We advocate for the things we would like to see and they are supposed to do them. Instead they have their own agenda to line their pockets and keep themselves perpetually employed by the taxpayers.

Anonymous said...

last anonymous:

well said.

Queens Crapper said...

Since someone is attempting to hijack this thread with rantings about a civic group they disagree with, I have deleted all comments that do not pertain to building dorms. Those who object, please take it to Gallagher's blog.

Taxpayer said...

"IDEAS? who cares about ideas, the world moves on ACTIONS, leave the house and do something other than taking pictures to have more IDEAS about."

Actions based on what? Impulses? Passions? Greed? Ignorance?

Ideas are converted to action after a civilized discussion and debate.

Ideas first. Actions next. That's the logical sequence.

[I thought pervert Gallagher was out on the island playing with himself until he "vindicates himself". Ever wonder what the moron means when he says "vindicate"?]

CJ said...

The residents of Long Island City and Jamaica Estates are obviously resentful over the continued unwanted incursion into their communities by the moneyed universities. The question sometimes comes up in the posts here about the effectiveness of blogs such as this one. Let’s turn this around for a moment. Just what power did you have up to this point? Other than an occasional letter to the editor or a community meeting, what opportunity did the average citizen have to express him/herself?

The blog has become the new town hall and the power brokers are unnerved because they have no way to control the free expression of ideas. Just take a look at the main page of this blog and examine all the community sites that have been born over the past two years. Community sites have become the powerful medium of ideas, not unlike the printing press our founding fathers risked their lives and fortunes to preserve.
Your expressed opinions are not just useless rants, they have captured the attention of those in the highest echelons of government and they do read this blog. Knowledge is power, free exchange of ideas are the medium of change.

Anonymous said...

Why people post anonymously:

At the Uneasy Intersection of Bloggers and the Law

Anonymous said...

You want an interesting twist - find out how many students (freshman) drop out year one and how many year 2 (sophomores) - to offset the 5% gain.

All about the money, students maybe to the teaching staff.