Monday, October 1, 2007

Domino Developers $weet on Lobbyists

By RICH CALDER, NY Post

The developers planning to convert the old Domino Sugar refinery on the Brooklyn waterfront into condos have forked over at least $577,000 to lobby city officials for a zoning change needed to break ground on the $1.2 billion project, records show.

CPC Resources and Isaac Kataan paid the law firm of Herrick Feinstein $537,802 in 2005 and 2006 to lobby the Planning Department regarding a pending application to have the 11.2-acre industrial tract rezoned for residential use, according to city records.

It also paid lobbyist Michele DeMilly another $40,000 over both years to lobby the City Council, the local community board and other officials. Records for 2007 were unavailable.

The developers' claim that they can't preserve the building with the famous "Domino Sugar" sign is a lot of hot air because they have "endless monies for lobbying," said Williamsburg activist Philip DePaolo.

But Lloyd Kaplan, a spokesman for the developers, said a bulk of the fees were related to correspondence with planners.

The Domino complex wasn't included in the city's rezoning of the Greenpoint/Williamsburg waterfront in 2005. Critics say the area can't handle the extra residents the project would bring, but many officials support the plan, since it would create 660 affordable housing units.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

They can't at least save the f-----g Domino sign!

Even the arrogant Rockrose developers
managed to save the Pepsi Cola sign
in their Queens West project !
(And so with with the Silvercup sign).

Anonymous said...

will have to read up on what lobbyists are allowed and not allowed to do.

Anonymous said...

$577,000 in legal fees over two years for a project this size doesn't seem like an extraordinary amount.

georgethebeliever said...

Gives new meaning to sugar daddies

Anonymous said...

"george the believer," hee hee.

Anonymous said...

Hey, the Robling Society has decided that industrial buildings visible from Manhattan should be saved.

Old Astoria? Historic downtown Long Island City? The Brooklyn waterfront?

Tear 'em down. The local losers will say nothing.

Anonymous said...

Why don't these groups ever ask the locals what is important?

No wait, don't give them a HINT they can control their destiny or that their opinions are important.

You want to know what is important in those communities? Ask the clubhouse.