Thursday, August 25, 2016

Interesting old Woodside house to make way for crap

Sunnyside Post
From Sunnyside Post:

Plans were filed with the Dept. of Buildings Tuesday for a six-story mixed use building at 54-21 Roosevelt Avenue. The structure will consist of ground floor retail, second floor health care facilities and four stories of apartments. The development would include seven dwelling units.

Demolition permits were filed in March.

The owner of the building, Al Zhu Lu, did not want to comment for this story.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

No one is willing to buy and rehab these neglected houses. Once they get too far in need of repair, it's not worth it.

Anonymous said...

That is a shame, but who would want to live in the shadow of the IRT and around the block from a grammar school? The new monstrosity will fit in just right with the other local brick monstrosities. What sort of 'health care' business will be there? Will you be able to look into the passing trains from the waiting room?

Anonymous said...

o one is willing to buy and rehab these neglected houses. Once they get too far in need of repair, it's not worth it.

not true - they are mostly built far better than the garbage going up.

Anonymous said...

Obviously true, since nobody bought it and rehabbed it.

Every old home is different but the plumbing and electric was not far better at all. Neither are the windows or the insulation or the heating/cooling systems. Usually that all needs to be replaced. Plus the sagging floors.


>>not true - they are mostly built far better than the garbage going up.

kapimap said...

As some may not notice, the home is being pressured out. Two very tall buildings are on both sides of the home, one under construction.
Dont knock the location, its a plus to have a grade school, subway acess . But under the el, not so good.

Jerry Rotondi said...

It used to be far better looking when it still had its arched multi paned multi color Victorian window.
I remember its clapboard barn red siding as I used to pass it on the #7 (since the 1950s) when my family moved to Queens.
From the looks of things, I wish we stayed in the Bronx! Now it looks like a tin can.

Anonymous said...

At lot of the buildings people complain about on here are pretty ugly or plain themselves, but this one is lovely if you look past the siding. A shame.

Anonymous said...

Architecturally theres... a lot going on, and not much of it is good. Lets face it, old does not always mean good. Poor proportions, unbalanced elevation, odd additions and dormers... and thats not even getting into the vinyl siding and poor upkeep.

Anonymous said...

Dont knock the location, its a plus to have a grade school, subway acess . But under the el, not so good.

So why in the hell are they replacing this with denser housing under the el - and all along the N/Q line too!

Anonymous said...

>Architecturally theres... a lot going on, and not much of it is good.

You say that like it's a bad thing, in this era of boxes inside boxes passing for architecture.

Anonymous said...

I call these new, monster homes 'hideosities,' and I think I invented the word. It doesn't seem to exist in any dictionary, much less online.

And, these hideosities are marring the integrity of what used to be nice, stable, single family, middle class households--before Reaganomics obliterated a stable way of life that served its unique Queens County burgs and hamlets with purposeful living.

Now, these homes are just structures to house dozens of people who are there illegally, as everyone's basement is now rented, as well as their attics, crawlspaces and garages. The burden of our water supply and sanitation seems to be getting bigger each year. My water pressure used to be able to remove paint from a wall. Now, it's not even strong enough to feel like a shower in the first place--but, oh how those water rates keep climbing to the Cosmos every year.

All politicians are diseased, mentally defected scum!

Anonymous said...

C'mon....get over it...it's coming down!
This IS NOT a star example of fine architecture in its pristine condition.
We have become SO hard up to preserve....that we overlook the big picture.
WTF is left here? Who the fuck is going to pay to "restore" this in the middle of a densely zoned nabe?
Who the hell wants to live here hemmed in close to an el line?
If you like it, you buy if.
I'd rather have a nice home further east. The real estate market place has determined it's fate decades ago.
Too bad though. It is cute.

Scooter Debouter said...

Unfortunately, most of the few pre-20th century houses that remain in Queens will be lost. Relics like this cannot survive being demolished to build denser housing to accommodate New York City's growing population.