Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Sergey dares to dream

Last week, our budget-challenged city announced a proposal to kill the Q74 bus, which connects Queens College to Kew Gardens. At the same time, work continues on the Second Avenue subway, scheduled to open in 2013. When the city asks to cut back, I’m daring to dream. (see graphic below)



A Q73 bus would run between Cunningham Park and Kew Gardens, relieving pressure on the Q46 and Q64 buses. If the Upper East Side is getting a new subway line, give something to Queens - give us a Q73!

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ah, I love these transit fantasies. But where will the money come from?... The poor and middle class bus riders, or the well-off commuting car drivers? Guess which choice is more equitable. No, you don't like that? The magical money fairy then?

Queens Crapper said...

How about we abolish CAU and use the money from that agency? Or how about we stop installing stupid technology that doesn't work (like bus GPS and subway tracking screens) and divert it toward practical things like bus lines? How about we stop rerouting buses to developers' malls and instead focus on providing service where its needed and wanted?

There are a million ways to fund a new bus line without resorting to new taxes.

Sergey Kadinsky said...

For those living along 73rd Avenue, commuting to Manhattan often involves 10 or more minutes of walking to the Q46 on Union Tpke. or the Q64 on Jewel Ave. As an alternative, some of the local residents feel tempted to drive to the nearest subway station, if not to their offices.

A Q73 would help take more cars off the streets.

Anonymous said...

Let's put our civic energies into
keeping the Q-74--not fantasizing

Rock Wangslot said...

Or how about we stop installing stupid technology that doesn't work (like bus GPS and subway tracking screens)

Really daring to dream there, eh, Crapper?
Who needs computerized signalling, GPS, and other 21st century technology when that 19th century stuff works... just... fine.

Queens Crapper said...

Maybe you should get yourself up to speed on current events before you comment next time, Rock. Both of these were installed by the MTA and neither of them work.

Anonymous said...

Crapper - the CAU is a City agency. Abolishing it (not the greatest of ideas IMHO) would do nothing to aid the MTA's finances -- unless this meant that the City would increase its funding to the MTA, something that has decreased to a trickle under Guiliani and Bloomberg.

I'm not going to argue with you over semantics -- I will merely reaffirm the fact that congestion pricing/tolls are the most equitable way to balance our transportation system (other than a progressive tax on carbon-based energy sources balanced by a reduction in payroll taxes).

Anonymous said...

No, cutting waste is definitely not the way to go. Let's tax everyone to death! Getting more revenue from con tax will not help the people in St. Albans who have an hour commute one way on a good day.

Anonymous said...

Yes, the City is supposed to fund the MTA since it is the one that directly benefits from the service. But congestion pricing was not supposed to be under City control. So cutting CAU would definitely work as far as paying part of what the City owes the MTA.

Rock Wangslot said...

Maybe you should get yourself up to speed on current events before you comment next time, Rock. Both of these were installed by the MTA and neither of them work.

Okay, you skinny-legged freak... you wanna play like that? Actually, I don't have the energy right now.

I've been following current events just as you. Maybe these technologies don't work perfectly... YET. But they work in other places, so they sure as hell can work here in NYC, right? Or do we lack the brains/skills possessed by people in other corners of the world?

Come on, you're a smart... globe. You know that not all wrinkles are ironed out when technology is undergoing a trial run. Which is exactly what we have with the computerized signaling and platform monitors - it's only on the L line. Once they work out all the bugs and introduce this stuff on other lines, it will result in smoother operations and better passenger information. Something we're painfully lacking now.

If you think the subways here are perfect, then I guess we have a simple difference of opinion. But if you'd like to see them brought up to 21st century standards, then don't bemoan the investment in technology that is intended to do just that.

Queens Crapper said...

"Once they work out all the bugs and introduce this stuff on other lines, it will result in smoother operations and better passenger information."

Yes! Just like the subway platform ETAs that are wrong constantly, or the maps on the trains that light up at the stops but are frequently not correct. Those were put in how long ago and still have "bugs"?

Rock Wangslot said...

Yes! Just like the subway platform ETAs that are wrong constantly, or the maps on the trains that light up at the stops but are frequently not correct. Those were put in how long ago and still have "bugs"?

Okay, sounds like you've given up. NYC just doesn't have what it takes to make anything work properly. Some days I feel the exact same way. (I have yet to see an ETA hold true, but I've never seen the map light the wrong stop, sorry.) I don't even know why you bother "blogging" any of your complaints, 'cause it's all hopeless...

Me, I'm generally of a different mind. I've seen this technology work elsewhere, and it's amazing when it does. Methinks we should give New Yorkers and their transit agencies the benefit of the doubt and a little more time to practice, because without these advances the system will be an even bigger mess 20, 30, 50 years from now.

Sorry. I realize HOPE is not welcome here.

Queens Crapper said...

How much "time to practice" is enough time? This doesn't come cheap, you know.

Rock Wangslot said...

How much "time to practice" is enough time? This doesn't come cheap, you know.

Good question. And sure, it's not cheap.

But to my mind that's no reason not to try. This city was blessed with some phenomenal early development of infrastructure (by a dubious mix of real estate interests! with willpower!) which luckily has been spared major destruction by war or natural disaster. The downside is that all this infrastructure is now decrepit and badly needs upgrading and modernizing. The only way to start this process is to START.

But we should have bus lines, too.
Space-age subways, and lots of bus lines. I like it all.