Friday, February 15, 2008

Old money meets modern crap

Here's the building that the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved to replace the Victorian townhouse that was destroyed when that crazy doctor blew himself - and the building - up in 2006.

Building in Historic Districts: Is LPC On Crack? should be the topic of an upcoming citywide preservation conference.


Now that I know the Upper East Side is heading down the crapper alongside Queens, I think I'll head home.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

Manhattan should create
it's own sister version of "Queens Crap".

They could name it "Manhattan Merde"
(French for "shit') !

This one is certainly a pile of crap-ola!

Tierney, Betts & Co.
are definitely on something.

No doubt, it's on
Bloomberg & his real estate pals' leash!

ken said...

the building would look ok, or at least normal, if it was flipped over on its side. (Try looking at the photo while tilting your head all the way to the left and see.)

Anonymous said...

That is a fantastic building, high quality and innovative architecture.
It should just not have been allowed to be built amongst the other brick facades. It's out of place. Too bad.

Anonymous said...

It looks like a limited occupancy version
of those indoor condo/mausoleums
that they're offering in most cemeteries these days!

Anonymous said...

Community preservation, as it exists in NYC, is a joke.

Headless chickens running about completely jerked by the system.

We need to rethink this and start from scratch.

Anonymous said...

At least it is holding up the beatiful building next door.

Merde it is - I say it is a Mallaca
property - know what I mean?

Anonymous said...

Look compared to the elegant buildings of a century ago, this is garbage.

The person who commissioned it has no taste (so typical of new money) and the architect that designed it has no skill (but I am certain charged the fool that hired him top dollar.)

The very fact it is in the East Side will very well get it an award of some sort. The need to justify this mess ... somehow.

Brooks of Sheffield said...

Uggo.

Anonymous said...

Why is it so hard for an archtect to design something that fits in with the buildings near it?

designerfromqueens said...

It depends on your client's needs. I think it is a great building as well. Although, I do agree that the design should have fit within the context of the neighborhood. What happened to the landmark status of the neighborhood?

Anonymous said...

The LPC is a joke.

Anonymous said...

This is one ugly building.

Shame on the Landmark Committee.

Anonymous said...

Maybe all the money that Tierney
has been busily socking away
throwing fights in favor of Bloomberg's developer pals
has finally bought him his dream home!

Anonymous said...

NYC has become Dodge City
and we've got the crookedest marshal
chairing the LPC!

Anonymous said...

This is one ugly building.

Shame on the Landmark Committee.

------------

I wish that was the level of rot, but it goes much further.

Preservation is in a deep funk if this is considered good taste, particularly siting it in that neighborhood.

This a choice made by the owner, the architect, the LPC, and yes my frieds, the quiet useless throat clearing by the whine-and-cheze set.

(Why do modern buildings just don't seem to age well, particularly in cities. I dread seeing this in 40 or 50 years, when it will get reclad and the NYT commenting on it say it was the taste of 'those dark years in preservation at the dawn of the 21st century.')