Sunday, February 10, 2008

Distinctive Astoria building for sale

Hey look - they're appealing to those with a sense of history instead of marketing it as a teardown. How refreshing.

17 comments:

georgetheatheist said...

I've always wondered what is up there in that turret?

Lucio said...

Let's just pray that the "wrong people" don't get ahold of it.
It would be a shame to loose such a historic building, I wonder why this wasn't landmarked.

loyal citizen said...

This is the approach to Old Astoria Village, and this building with its distinctive turret intended to make a bold statement. It is Astoria's Flatiron.

The Greater Astoria Historical Society should actively be seeking a preservation-minded buyer. If that becomes a reality, then work with the buyer to restore it. There's great potential here, and it is indeed refreshing to see it being pitched as "architecturally unique." Let's pray.

Anonymous said...

Ahem....
how come it's not.... er...uh....landmarked ?

Wouldn't it not "meet the criteria"
of LPC's chief troll/gate keeper in charge
of "research" Mary Beth Betts ?

I formerly request
that GAHS immediately put in an RFE !

Anonymous said...

Goodwill Industries, with a study written by Pratt, has tried to rebrand this area as 'Two Coves'.

Not a hint of the historic fabric of the community is mentioned in the report.

So much for help from the preservation community.

Anonymous said...

It would be a shame to loose such a historic building, I wonder why this wasn't landmarked.
--------

That is easy. The same reason that almost no buildings in this part of Queens have been landmarked for decades.

1. The area has been red-zoned by LPC.

2.The preservation community has not made an effort to fight this discrimination against working class communities or arbitrary designations that favors the wealthy and white.

3.The Queens preservation community has been less than effective.

Anonymous said...

The Greater Astoria Historical Society should actively be seeking a preservation-minded buyer. \\-----------\\

Newtown Historical should be seeking a buyer for St Saviour's.

HDC should be seeking buyers for East Village buildings.

Berman should be seeking buyers for West Village properties.

Landmarks West should be seeking buyers for 2 Columbus Circle.

QHS should be seeking buyers for Flushing properties.

etc etc etc

Well, that was refreshing. Solved NYC's preservation issues in one posting.

Anonymous said...

Old Astoria Village remains the largest most important community without a shred of protection.

Lets see the presevation community make an effort to push for its designation.

Perhaps the first step would be if HDC, which unaccountably only listed it as endangered a few weeks ago, moves from suggesting protection for only a handful of buildings to protection for the fabric of the entire community.

After all, its fabric is more intact than the Village.

They can start with working with a broad range of local groups in this regard.

Anonymous said...

This was brought to the attention of the preservation community on a number of occasions.

City Lore, for example, is interested in the Queens immigrant experience.

Old Astoria does not qualify.

Anonymous said...

A number of organizations have filed a number of requests to have the LPC designate this area.

Every one was rejected. Even buildings of more historic fabric (Astoria Institue) or architectual merit (Remsen House)

Why should LPC treat this any different?

The problem is not submitting yet another application, or writing yet another letter, or wasting time seeking the 'right' buyer (whatever the hell that means), but changing the envirnment of presevation in which we swim.

Break out of the same tired ideas and start to think outside the box.

Anonymous said...

Let the Revolution start here!

Anonymous said...

It has already, mister, it has already.

Anonymous said...

I agree, it should be a landmark and rehabilitated to its authentic rendering of when it was originally constructed.
But where were all you people while it was becoming more and more of a rundown, unmaintained piece of crap over the past 25 years?

Anonymous said...

"Hey look - they're appealing to those with a sense of history instead of marketing it as a teardown. How refreshing."

That's probably because they couldn't come up with anything else financially viable with this property... I am sure they have thought about tearing it down...

Anonymous said...

if the zoning was good TRUST ME they would be marketing it as a tear down

Anonymous said...

Unfortunately when it comes to the general lack of action on the part of ALL "hysterical" societies,
words come more easily than hard work
(especially on blogs).

I hope that the western Queens groups
intend to raise some callouses
and show us their rough hands before all this is over!

Talk certainly is cheap.... these days, especially!

jerry rotondi said...

I'm openly requesting that the
Greater Astoria Historical Society
join the Citizens' Emergency Committee To Preserve Preservation (CECPP) in their lawsuit
against the Landmarks Preservation Commission
in the matter of outstanding RFEs.

If you have an open request for evaluation (RFE)
for Astoria's "flat iron building", or any other
that's being ignored,
then I urge you to add them to CECPP's list .

What have you got to lose? It costs nothing.

Are there any sound reasons for not doing so ?

I invite anyone who has submitted RFEs
that have been lying dormant at the LPC
to also join this legal action.

I had signed onto the CECPP's first legal action
which was partially successful.